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Welcome our two new Librarians!

Joplin Public Library is thrilled to announce the appointment of two brand new librarian positions. New librarian appointments are rare for the Library, with the last unique job addition taking place in 2006, when a teen services librarian was added. On August 2, the Joplin Public Library promoted Jason Sullivan, a reference assistant, to the newly created role of electronic resources librarian, and on September 27, welcomed Derek Moser as its first adult programming librarian. There has been a strongly perceived need for both of these positions, and their addition will likely provide a significant enhancement to patron services.

The new positions come with some exciting opportunities.  Moser will coordinate in-house and outreach programs for adults, assist users with research, reader’s advisory, and other services, and strive to connect with community partners.  Sullivan will manage and support access to the Library’s digital information resources, coordinate interlibrary loan services, and administer the integrated library system.

Sullivan has worked in the Library’s reference department since 2007. His longevity and dedication to the Library, combined with his educational experience and the skills acquired in the Reference Department make him an ideal fit for his new position.  He holds a Masters in Library Science from Kent State University, a Masters in Education from University of Missouri, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from University of Denver.

Moser’s education, work experience and professional skill set make him a noteworthy addition to the Library team.  He holds a Masters in Library Science from the University of Kentucky, a Bachelor of Arts in Religion from MidAmerica Nazarene University, and is a veteran of the Joplin Public Library where he previously worked from 2016 to 2018.  First, as a children’s library assistant and then later as the assistant circulation supervisor.  In 2018, he accepted the library director role at the Seth Wilson Library at Ozark Christian College.

“One of the best aspects of working at the Joplin Public Library is the amount of buy-in the staff has regarding the Library’s mission,” said Moser. “The Library is filled with people committed to ‘opening tomorrow’s doors today through diverse opportunities to learn, create, explore, and have fun.’ To be a part of a staff committed to such a task is truly an honor.”

It’s National Poetry Month!

A Dazzling Display of Dogs by Betsy Franco, illustrations by Michael Wertz

iF: A Treasury of Poems for Almost Every Possibility edited by Allie Esiri and Rachel Kelly

 

I’m so excited! April is National Poetry Month!  In 1996, the American Academy of Poets launched this annual celebration to “remind the public that poets have an integral role to play in our culture and that poetry matters”. Poetry is a rich gift offering something for everyone. Whether formal or informal, fancy or casual, long or short, poetry is a gateway to the universe. It explores the past and worlds unknown, speaks what the heart cannot say, brings solace and strength, yelps with joy, makes us laugh.

If you’ve only encountered dry, dusty poems or have only had poetry forced upon you, try one of these books instead. Both of them are great for family time or solo reading, and both, along with other poetry books, are available through the Library’s OverDrive/Missouri Libraries 2 Go e-resource found at https://molib2go.overdrive.com/missouripldc-joplin/content or the Libby app.

You’ll find a variety of verses–rhyming and not–and subjects in these poems. They are fun to see and hear! Try reading them aloud, play around with the tempo, feel the rhythm of the words. For extra fun, try reading outside! It’s a super opportunity to explore poems on your own or to build language skills with kids and is easily adaptable to electronic communication.

An easy place to start is with iF: A Treasury of Poems for Almost Every Possibility, an anthology of well known or frequently taught poems with a smattering of less well known verses from famous poets. British editors Allie Esiri and Rachel Kelly created an app to connect kids to poetry and have collected their favorites to encourage poetry time at home. Their selections range from nursery rhymes to nonsense verse to love poems to historical ballads–lots of familiar territory here. Plenty of famous, pre-20th century names are included–Wordsworth, Poe, Shakespeare, Dickinson, Browning, Rossetti, Robert Louis Stevenson, A.A. Milne, Lewis Carroll, among others–with a smattering of later poets.

iF offers helpful aids to understand poetry’s structure and to connect poetry to children’s lives. Esiri and Kelly include a glossary of poetic forms and terms accessible to families exploring how poems work. The editors also divide the book into sections such as “Growing Up”, “Humor and Nonsense”, “Animals, Nature and Seasons”, and “Bedtime”; each section starts with easier poems and progresses to longer, more complex ones. Many poems have short explanatory notes from the editors. An index of authors and index of titles make it easy to search for a familiar entry. Most helpful is the “Poems for Possibilities” list which suggests poems for different situations such as needing courage, seeking guidance, facing grief, or needing “a pocket full of peace”.

While iF is a gateway to read-aloud poetry, A Dazzling Display of Dogs is proof that poetry can be a feast for the eyes and ears. Poet Betsy Franco has transformed dog stories from elementary students into lively concrete poems which dance across the pages. Concrete poetry often refers to poems with outlines depicting a recognizable shape and which may or may not rhyme–a verse about a bell written in the shape of a bell, for example. Here the poems are artworks with a life of their own. Illustrator Michael Wortz uses each poem’s shape to create energetic scenes in a palette of blues and warm reds, oranges, and yellow. He layers shapes and textures in a look resembling cut paper come to life.

Suitable for reading cover to cover or randomly, Franco’s book is chock full of delight. Try “Fast Al, the Retired Greyhound”, a former track racer whose story is told in the circular path he runs on the beach. Or check out “Apollo at the Beach” which shows a yapping dog chasing swooping seagulls of text. “Emmett’s Ode to His Tennis Ball” is a riot of yellow and blue with a “slobbery, sloppy, slimy sphere” of poem in his mouth. “White Collar Blues” is a Cone of Shame worn by Mathilda who is having none of it.

There’s plenty of fun to be had during National Poetry Month.  For virtual activities from the American Academy of Poets, check out https://poets.org/ and click on “National Poetry Month” at the top of the screen. See the Library’s webpage for links to our e-resources for books of all sorts, http://www.joplinpubliclibrary.org/

Hope you enjoy the poetry of words and of nature this month!